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Macmillan Higher Education Palgrave Higher Education

The Historical Study of Women

England 1500-1700

ISBN 9780333662694
Publication Date December 2010
Formats Paperback Hardcover 
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan

The Historical Study of Women: England 1500-1700 provides a richly detailed survey of the history and historiography of early-modern women in England during the Reformation and Civil War. Covering a wide variety of key topics, the book explores the history of ideas, women's rights, law and criminality, witchcraft, queenship, courtship and marriage, family and the household, childrearing and the world of property-ownership and work. It also provides valuable insights into the development of women's writing and political participation in the period.

Capern treats women's history as inherently political and offers a new interpretative framework for understanding the history of femininity in early-modern England. Clear and comprehensive, this is significant reading for anyone interested in early-modern English history.

AMANDA CAPERN is Lecturer in Women's History at the University of Hull, UK. She works on all aspects of early-modern women's history and her publications include articles on women, land and family and women writers. She co-edits Palgrave Macmillan's Gender and History series.

Acknowledgements
Introduction: The Historical Study of Women: England 1500-1700
Intellectual Foundations
Querelle des Femmes
Femininity: Prescription, Rhetoric and Context
Law and Private Life
Politics and Authority in the Public Sphere
Religion and Civil War
Education and Women's Writing
Conclusion: Femininity Transformed
Index

Reviews

'Writing a textbook about such a diverse topic as the history of early modern women is no mean feat...Amanda Capern's book is by far the most wide-ranging and will set the debates for much future work in the fields of both historical and literary studies about early-modern women.' - Jackie Eales, Journal of Gender Studies
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