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Macmillan Higher Education Palgrave Higher Education

How to Write Your Undergraduate Dissertation

Edition 2nd Edition
ISBN 9781137389763
Publication Date August 2014
Formats Paperback Ebook 
Publisher Palgrave
Series Palgrave Study Skills

Unlike any other book this teaches students how to generate their own ideas and develop them into original research projects. Using examples from all disciplines, it not only teaches students how to plan and research using all the qualitative and quantitative techniques and instruments, but also how to construct arguments and use evidence and language consistently. Throughout it emphasizes that writing is the most difficult form of thinking and dissertations are a test of our ability both to think and write clearly.

Bryan Greetham was educated at the universities of Kent and Sussex, UK. He holds a PhD in moral philosophy from the University of Newcastle, Australia. He is currently engaged in research into moral thinking and the Holocaust, and teaches philosophy at the University of Maryland. He is the author of How to Write Better Essays, Thinking Skills for Professionals and Philosophy.

Preface
Acknowledgements
1. Introduction
PART I: EXAMINERS AND SUPERVISORS 2. Examiners – What Are They Looking For?
3. Working With Your Supervisor
PART II: GENERATING AND DEVELOPING ORIGINAL IDEAS 4. What Activities Suit You Best?
5. Types of Research
6. What Interests You Most?
7. Generating Your Own Ideas 1: Using Trigger Questions
8. Generating Your Own Ideas 2: Perspectives and Levels
9. Developing Your Ideas 1: Causal Relations
10. Developing Your Ideas 2: Conceptual Relations
11. Original Questions and Hypotheses 1: Using Analogies
12. Original Questions and Hypotheses 2: Working With Your Structures
PART III: DECIDING ON YOUR PROJECT 13. Searching the Literature 1: Knowing What to Look For
14. Searching the Literature 2: How to Search
15. Choosing the Topic
PART IV: ORGANISING YOUR WORK 16. Planning Your Research
17. Managing Your Time
18. Your Retrieval System
19. Reading
20. Note-taking
PART V: DOING YOUR RESEARCH 21. Qualitative and Quantitative Research
22. Secondary Sources
23. Primary Sources 1: Quantitative Research
24. Primary Sources 2: Designing and Distributing Your Questionnaire
25. Primary Sources 3: Qualitative Research – Interviews and Focus Groups
26. Primary Sources 4: Qualitative Research – Case Studies and Observations
PART VI: PLANNING YOUR DISSERTATION 27. The Main Components and Introduction
28. The Literature Review
29. Research Methods, Findings, Conclusions and Appendices
PART VII: ORGANISING YOUR THINKING 30. Developing Consistent Arguments 1: The Components
31. Developing Consistent Arguments 2: The Connections
32. Using Evidence 1: Describing It
33. Using Evidence 2: Drawing Inferences
34. Using Evidence 3: Creating Causal Connections
35. Using Language 1: Clarity Jargon
36. Using Language 2: Clarity Manipulative Words
37. Using Language 3: Consistency
PART VIII: WRITING YOUR DISSERTATION 38. The First Draft
39. Style 1: Finding Your Own Voice
40. Style 2: Simplicity and Economy
PART IX: PLAGIARISM, REFERENCING AND BIBLIOGRAPHIES 41. Plagiarism
42. Referencing and Bibliographies
PART X: EDITING Revision 1: The Structure
Revision 2: The Content
Conclusion.

Reviews

Key strengths are its use of language which is easy to understand and clear exercises. This is a great book and I advise my students to buy it.' - L Hibberd, Leeds Metropolitan University, UK 'I like the straightforwardness of the book: 'it does what is says on the tin' – and I think undergraduate students appreciate this, especially if they are somewhat intimidated by the task of having to design their own article-length piece of original research.' - S Rossbach, University of Kent, UK Amazon customer reviews - 'Step by step guidance just what you need in your final year. Great tips to help you in your major project.' 'This is a very good book for those undertaking a dissertation for the first time. It reads well and is not too jargonistic!'
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